OPEN DAYS & NEWS - JAMES ALLEN'S GIRLS' SCHOOL

New music centre at James Allen’s Girls’ School to honour Ralph Vaughan Williams

The auditorium of the school’s Community Music Centre will be named after the famous composer who taught music at the school in the early twentieth century.

Officially opening in September, the centre will provide the school and local community with complete facilities for music of all genres from orchestral and choral through to contemporary bands and soloists. The vast Vaughan Williams Auditorium will be the centre piece with capacity to seat audiences of 500 people and providing state of the art, professional lighting and sound equipment. There will also be ample space for performers to rehearse ahead of their shows with 15 practice rooms.

Hugh Cobbe, Director of the Vaughan Williams Charitable Trust which was set up by the composer’s widow Ursula to promote his work, said:

“Ralph Vaughan Williams once said that music enables people to see past facts to the very essence of things in a way which science cannot do. He would have been delighted that the new Community Music Centre at James Allen’s Girl’s School was to bear his name.

“So much of his music was intended for the wider community and the Trust, set up under his widow’s will, very much has that in mind in its operations. We wish the new Vaughan Williams Auditorium every success.”

Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872 – 1958) is one of Britain’s most popular composers whose works are still widely performed today. His piece “The Lark Ascending” has regularly topped polls of the country’s most popular pieces of classical music.

He came to JAGS as director of music in 1904 and later introduced his friend Gustav Holst to the school. Holst went on to teach music there for over 15 years and the hall in the main school building is named after him.

Headmistress of JAGS, Sally-Anne Huang said:

“We can’t wait to open the doors to the new music centre and share it with our neighbours. This is not just about JAGS, it will also be here for other local schools, musicians and community groups. 

“It is such a privilege to be able to commemorate Ralph Vaughan Williams in this way. Having the Vaughan Williams Auditorium alongside the Holst Hall will be a fitting tribute reflecting the exceptional musical heritage laid down by these great names and continued here at JAGS into the twenty first century.”

 

Edward Alleyn’s Gift: The Foundation Schools’ Concert Southbank Centre’s Royal Festival Hall, 16 March 2016

The three Dulwich Foundation Schools Alleyn’s, Dulwich College and JAGS will come together on 16 March 2016 to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the consecration of Christ’s Chapel of God’s Gift at Dulwich. 

Over 450 pupils, alumni, teachers, parents and members of the local community will perform Verdi’s choral masterpiece, the Requiem Mass at Southbank Centre’s Royal Festival Hall. They will be joined by internationally recognised soloists Jane Irwin (Soprano), Louise Callinan (Mezzo Soprano), David Butt Philip (Tenor) and Rodney Earl Clarke, Old Alleynian (Bass). 

Verdi’s Requiem is a masterpiece of late 19th century composition and the programme will also include Verdi’s Pater Noster which will be performed by all those singing and playing. The concert will be conducted by the three Directors of Music: Mr Chris Dearmer, Mr Richard Mayo and Mr Peter Gritton.

Christ’s Chapel in Dulwich was consecrated in 1616 by George Abbot, Archbishop of Canterbury, as part of the Dulwich College foundation. Edward Alleyn built his College of God’s Gift on Dulwich Green and since then the Chapel has been a place of worship for the local community and for the three Dulwich Schools of the Foundation; Alleyn’s, Dulwich College and JAGS. 

The Heads of the three Foundation Schools, Dr Gary Savage of Alleyn’s, Dr Joe Spence of Dulwich College, and Sally-Anne Huang of JAGS, anticipate this wonderful occasion will be an opportunity for the wider communities of the three schools to come together and celebrate in music. All are welcome and tickets are available through Southbank Centre.

JAGS student Emily Scoops Young Scientists of the Year Prize
Sixth former Emily Xu has taken top prize out of 500 entries in the Big Bang Competition. Her prize is for research that could revolutionise the way the pharmaceutical industry creates safer, more efficient drugs.
 

The student at James Allen's Girs' School, has been awarded the GSK UK Young Scientist of the Year title at The Big Bang UK Young Scientists and Engineers Competition for her project “New Ways Of Separating Mirror Image Molecules

Emily’s project looked at new methods for separating different types of molecules that react differently once inside the human body but can be very difficult to distinguish, as they are mirror images of each other. This process could be very helpful in the pharmaceutical industry – in the case of ibuprofen, this could help make it more effective; in the case of thalidomide, this could have eliminated negative effects.

This is the latest prestigious recognition of Emily’s work which has previously won her a Nuffield Foundation Scholarship and a Gold award from the British Science Association.

Emily reached the UK finals of The Competition having won a place in the online heats.

Over 500 finalists from across the country were selected to show their ideas at The Big Bang Fair where ten were then shortlisted to pitch Dragon’s Den-style to a panel of VIP judges - including Nikki Yates (Senior Vice President, GSK Europe), Andrew Smyth (Rolls-Royce aerospace engineer) and Alex Deakin (Met Office meteorologist and weather presenter).

The Big Bang Competition is an annual contest designed to recognise and reward young people's achievements in all areas of science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM), as well as helping them build skills and confidence in project-based work.

Speaking of her award, Emily said:

“Firstly, I’m really shocked but at the same time I am very honoured to be given this award. The overall Big Bang experience is definitely one that I’d recommend to any other young person interested in pursuing science.”

Congratulating the winner, Mark Titterington, Chief Executive of EngineeringUK, which organises The Big Bang Competition, said:

“Emily stunned judges with the insight, creativity and hard work that went into their brilliant entry. This innovative project was an extremely impressive project that makes her a worthy winner of this year’s award. I’m hopeful that seeing what they’ve achieved will encourage young people across the UK to enter next year’s Competition.

“While it’s easy to see why this project was a hit with judges, I have been blown away by the quality of entries from all of our finalists - both in terms of the work that went into them and the way they showcased that work with such confidence at The Fair. It certainly bodes well for the future that the scientists, engineers and inventors of tomorrow are already producing such astute and creative project work.”

Head Teacher of JAGS, Sally-Anne Huang said:

“STEM subjects are alive and kicking at JAGS and we are all well aware of the significance of bringing so many young women into this area of study.  We are so proud of Emily and delighted by her well-earned success.  She is a fantastic role model to younger pupils at JAGS and beyond.”

Emily showed her project to thousands of visitors to The Big Bang Fair at the NEC in Birmingham, the largest celebration of science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) for young people in the UK.

The day after winning she also sat on the BBC Breakfast sofa alongside other winners from the day she talked to the presenters, and millions of viewers watching about her work. 

 

2015 TeenTech awards

An e-water tap for Africa, a flat-pack disaster home, sunglasses to monitor epilepsy and a guitar with never-ending strings were just some of the winning innovations showcased by talented teenagers at the 2015 TeenTech Awards. These awards were created for UK students from 11-16 to look at problems around them, both large and small, to see if they can find solutions. The industry judges were bowled over by the creativity and skills shown by young people across the UK.

Over 100 young innovators travelled to London to present their pioneering ideas to teams of judges made up of industry experts, celebrity science presenters, journalists and eminent academics including Top Gear’s James May, BBC Click’s Kate Russell, BBC Bang Goes The Theory’s Dallas Campbell, actress Katy Brand, comedian Jon Culshaw, TV’s Dr Christian Jessen and TeenTech co-founder and BBC Tomorrow’s World reporter Maggie Philbin.

Congratulations to James Allen’s Girls’ School pupils, Y10 Alice Hopkins and Iona Tompkins, pictured with sixth form Arkwright Scholar and mentor, Katherine Gray, who recently won TeenTech’s brand-new award for 2015. The ‘Consumer Innovation’ category challenged participants to use technology to solve an everyday problem. It’s all under wraps, but TeenTech sponsor, Maplin, is now working with Alice and Iona on their product for helping cyclists to indicate more clearly and safely, which will be marketed, and sold in their stores – with all profits going back to the winners. They will receive their award at Buckingham Palace in November.

Open Days

Senior School (11-18yrs)

Saturday 7th October, 10am-1pm

Senior School (11+ only)

Wednesday 27th September, 1030am-12noon

Thursday 19th October, 10.30am-12noon

 

For additional Wednesday morning tours of the Pre-prep and Prep please contact Anne Long 020 8693 3465

 

SOME OF OUR SCHOOLS REQUIRE YOU TO BOOK A PLACE AT AN OPEN DAY. PLEASE CHECK SCHOOL WEBSITES FOR DETAILS.
 

New music centre at James Allen’s Girls’ School to honour Ralph Vaughan Williams

The auditorium of the school’s Community Music Centre will be named after the famous composer who taught music at the school in the early twentieth century.

Officially opening in September, the centre will provide the school and local community with complete facilities for music of all genres from orchestral and choral through to contemporary bands and soloists. The vast Vaughan Williams Auditorium will be the centre piece with capacity to seat audiences of 500 people and providing state of the art, professional lighting and sound equipment. There will also be ample space for performers to rehearse ahead of their shows with 15 practice rooms.

Hugh Cobbe, Director of the Vaughan Williams Charitable Trust which was set up by the composer’s widow Ursula to promote his work, said:

“Ralph Vaughan Williams once said that music enables people to see past facts to the very essence of things in a way which science cannot do. He would have been delighted that the new Community Music Centre at James Allen’s Girl’s School was to bear his name.

“So much of his music was intended for the wider community and the Trust, set up under his widow’s will, very much has that in mind in its operations. We wish the new Vaughan Williams Auditorium every success.”

Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872 – 1958) is one of Britain’s most popular composers whose works are still widely performed today. His piece “The Lark Ascending” has regularly topped polls of the country’s most popular pieces of classical music.

He came to JAGS as director of music in 1904 and later introduced his friend Gustav Holst to the school. Holst went on to teach music there for over 15 years and the hall in the main school building is named after him.

Headmistress of JAGS, Sally-Anne Huang said:

“We can’t wait to open the doors to the new music centre and share it with our neighbours. This is not just about JAGS, it will also be here for other local schools, musicians and community groups. 

“It is such a privilege to be able to commemorate Ralph Vaughan Williams in this way. Having the Vaughan Williams Auditorium alongside the Holst Hall will be a fitting tribute reflecting the exceptional musical heritage laid down by these great names and continued here at JAGS into the twenty first century.”

 

Open Days

Senior School (11-18yrs)

Saturday 7th October, 10am-1pm

Senior School (11+ only)

Wednesday 27th September, 1030am-12noon

Thursday 19th October, 10.30am-12noon

 

For additional Wednesday morning tours of the Pre-prep and Prep please contact Anne Long 020 8693 3465

 

SOME OF OUR SCHOOLS REQUIRE YOU TO BOOK A PLACE AT AN OPEN DAY. PLEASE CHECK SCHOOL WEBSITES FOR DETAILS.
 

2015 TeenTech awards

An e-water tap for Africa, a flat-pack disaster home, sunglasses to monitor epilepsy and a guitar with never-ending strings were just some of the winning innovations showcased by talented teenagers at the 2015 TeenTech Awards. These awards were created for UK students from 11-16 to look at problems around them, both large and small, to see if they can find solutions. The industry judges were bowled over by the creativity and skills shown by young people across the UK.

Over 100 young innovators travelled to London to present their pioneering ideas to teams of judges made up of industry experts, celebrity science presenters, journalists and eminent academics including Top Gear’s James May, BBC Click’s Kate Russell, BBC Bang Goes The Theory’s Dallas Campbell, actress Katy Brand, comedian Jon Culshaw, TV’s Dr Christian Jessen and TeenTech co-founder and BBC Tomorrow’s World reporter Maggie Philbin.

Congratulations to James Allen’s Girls’ School pupils, Y10 Alice Hopkins and Iona Tompkins, pictured with sixth form Arkwright Scholar and mentor, Katherine Gray, who recently won TeenTech’s brand-new award for 2015. The ‘Consumer Innovation’ category challenged participants to use technology to solve an everyday problem. It’s all under wraps, but TeenTech sponsor, Maplin, is now working with Alice and Iona on their product for helping cyclists to indicate more clearly and safely, which will be marketed, and sold in their stores – with all profits going back to the winners. They will receive their award at Buckingham Palace in November.

JAGS student Emily Scoops Young Scientists of the Year Prize
Sixth former Emily Xu has taken top prize out of 500 entries in the Big Bang Competition. Her prize is for research that could revolutionise the way the pharmaceutical industry creates safer, more efficient drugs.
 

The student at James Allen's Girs' School, has been awarded the GSK UK Young Scientist of the Year title at The Big Bang UK Young Scientists and Engineers Competition for her project “New Ways Of Separating Mirror Image Molecules

Emily’s project looked at new methods for separating different types of molecules that react differently once inside the human body but can be very difficult to distinguish, as they are mirror images of each other. This process could be very helpful in the pharmaceutical industry – in the case of ibuprofen, this could help make it more effective; in the case of thalidomide, this could have eliminated negative effects.

This is the latest prestigious recognition of Emily’s work which has previously won her a Nuffield Foundation Scholarship and a Gold award from the British Science Association.

Emily reached the UK finals of The Competition having won a place in the online heats.

Over 500 finalists from across the country were selected to show their ideas at The Big Bang Fair where ten were then shortlisted to pitch Dragon’s Den-style to a panel of VIP judges - including Nikki Yates (Senior Vice President, GSK Europe), Andrew Smyth (Rolls-Royce aerospace engineer) and Alex Deakin (Met Office meteorologist and weather presenter).

The Big Bang Competition is an annual contest designed to recognise and reward young people's achievements in all areas of science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM), as well as helping them build skills and confidence in project-based work.

Speaking of her award, Emily said:

“Firstly, I’m really shocked but at the same time I am very honoured to be given this award. The overall Big Bang experience is definitely one that I’d recommend to any other young person interested in pursuing science.”

Congratulating the winner, Mark Titterington, Chief Executive of EngineeringUK, which organises The Big Bang Competition, said:

“Emily stunned judges with the insight, creativity and hard work that went into their brilliant entry. This innovative project was an extremely impressive project that makes her a worthy winner of this year’s award. I’m hopeful that seeing what they’ve achieved will encourage young people across the UK to enter next year’s Competition.

“While it’s easy to see why this project was a hit with judges, I have been blown away by the quality of entries from all of our finalists - both in terms of the work that went into them and the way they showcased that work with such confidence at The Fair. It certainly bodes well for the future that the scientists, engineers and inventors of tomorrow are already producing such astute and creative project work.”

Head Teacher of JAGS, Sally-Anne Huang said:

“STEM subjects are alive and kicking at JAGS and we are all well aware of the significance of bringing so many young women into this area of study.  We are so proud of Emily and delighted by her well-earned success.  She is a fantastic role model to younger pupils at JAGS and beyond.”

Emily showed her project to thousands of visitors to The Big Bang Fair at the NEC in Birmingham, the largest celebration of science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) for young people in the UK.

The day after winning she also sat on the BBC Breakfast sofa alongside other winners from the day she talked to the presenters, and millions of viewers watching about her work. 

 

Edward Alleyn’s Gift: The Foundation Schools’ Concert Southbank Centre’s Royal Festival Hall, 16 March 2016

The three Dulwich Foundation Schools Alleyn’s, Dulwich College and JAGS will come together on 16 March 2016 to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the consecration of Christ’s Chapel of God’s Gift at Dulwich. 

Over 450 pupils, alumni, teachers, parents and members of the local community will perform Verdi’s choral masterpiece, the Requiem Mass at Southbank Centre’s Royal Festival Hall. They will be joined by internationally recognised soloists Jane Irwin (Soprano), Louise Callinan (Mezzo Soprano), David Butt Philip (Tenor) and Rodney Earl Clarke, Old Alleynian (Bass). 

Verdi’s Requiem is a masterpiece of late 19th century composition and the programme will also include Verdi’s Pater Noster which will be performed by all those singing and playing. The concert will be conducted by the three Directors of Music: Mr Chris Dearmer, Mr Richard Mayo and Mr Peter Gritton.

Christ’s Chapel in Dulwich was consecrated in 1616 by George Abbot, Archbishop of Canterbury, as part of the Dulwich College foundation. Edward Alleyn built his College of God’s Gift on Dulwich Green and since then the Chapel has been a place of worship for the local community and for the three Dulwich Schools of the Foundation; Alleyn’s, Dulwich College and JAGS. 

The Heads of the three Foundation Schools, Dr Gary Savage of Alleyn’s, Dr Joe Spence of Dulwich College, and Sally-Anne Huang of JAGS, anticipate this wonderful occasion will be an opportunity for the wider communities of the three schools to come together and celebrate in music. All are welcome and tickets are available through Southbank Centre.

New music centre at James Allen’s Girls’ School to honour Ralph Vaughan Williams

The auditorium of the school’s Community Music Centre will be named after the famous composer who taught music at the school in the early twentieth century.

Officially opening in September, the centre will provide the school and local community with complete facilities for music of all genres from orchestral and choral through to contemporary bands and soloists. The vast Vaughan Williams Auditorium will be the centre piece with capacity to seat audiences of 500 people and providing state of the art, professional lighting and sound equipment. There will also be ample space for performers to rehearse ahead of their shows with 15 practice rooms.

Hugh Cobbe, Director of the Vaughan Williams Charitable Trust which was set up by the composer’s widow Ursula to promote his work, said:

“Ralph Vaughan Williams once said that music enables people to see past facts to the very essence of things in a way which science cannot do. He would have been delighted that the new Community Music Centre at James Allen’s Girl’s School was to bear his name.

“So much of his music was intended for the wider community and the Trust, set up under his widow’s will, very much has that in mind in its operations. We wish the new Vaughan Williams Auditorium every success.”

Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872 – 1958) is one of Britain’s most popular composers whose works are still widely performed today. His piece “The Lark Ascending” has regularly topped polls of the country’s most popular pieces of classical music.

He came to JAGS as director of music in 1904 and later introduced his friend Gustav Holst to the school. Holst went on to teach music there for over 15 years and the hall in the main school building is named after him.

Headmistress of JAGS, Sally-Anne Huang said:

“We can’t wait to open the doors to the new music centre and share it with our neighbours. This is not just about JAGS, it will also be here for other local schools, musicians and community groups. 

“It is such a privilege to be able to commemorate Ralph Vaughan Williams in this way. Having the Vaughan Williams Auditorium alongside the Holst Hall will be a fitting tribute reflecting the exceptional musical heritage laid down by these great names and continued here at JAGS into the twenty first century.”

 

JAGS student Emily Scoops Young Scientists of the Year Prize
Sixth former Emily Xu has taken top prize out of 500 entries in the Big Bang Competition. Her prize is for research that could revolutionise the way the pharmaceutical industry creates safer, more efficient drugs.
 

The student at James Allen's Girs' School, has been awarded the GSK UK Young Scientist of the Year title at The Big Bang UK Young Scientists and Engineers Competition for her project “New Ways Of Separating Mirror Image Molecules

Emily’s project looked at new methods for separating different types of molecules that react differently once inside the human body but can be very difficult to distinguish, as they are mirror images of each other. This process could be very helpful in the pharmaceutical industry – in the case of ibuprofen, this could help make it more effective; in the case of thalidomide, this could have eliminated negative effects.

This is the latest prestigious recognition of Emily’s work which has previously won her a Nuffield Foundation Scholarship and a Gold award from the British Science Association.

Emily reached the UK finals of The Competition having won a place in the online heats.

Over 500 finalists from across the country were selected to show their ideas at The Big Bang Fair where ten were then shortlisted to pitch Dragon’s Den-style to a panel of VIP judges - including Nikki Yates (Senior Vice President, GSK Europe), Andrew Smyth (Rolls-Royce aerospace engineer) and Alex Deakin (Met Office meteorologist and weather presenter).

The Big Bang Competition is an annual contest designed to recognise and reward young people's achievements in all areas of science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM), as well as helping them build skills and confidence in project-based work.

Speaking of her award, Emily said:

“Firstly, I’m really shocked but at the same time I am very honoured to be given this award. The overall Big Bang experience is definitely one that I’d recommend to any other young person interested in pursuing science.”

Congratulating the winner, Mark Titterington, Chief Executive of EngineeringUK, which organises The Big Bang Competition, said:

“Emily stunned judges with the insight, creativity and hard work that went into their brilliant entry. This innovative project was an extremely impressive project that makes her a worthy winner of this year’s award. I’m hopeful that seeing what they’ve achieved will encourage young people across the UK to enter next year’s Competition.

“While it’s easy to see why this project was a hit with judges, I have been blown away by the quality of entries from all of our finalists - both in terms of the work that went into them and the way they showcased that work with such confidence at The Fair. It certainly bodes well for the future that the scientists, engineers and inventors of tomorrow are already producing such astute and creative project work.”

Head Teacher of JAGS, Sally-Anne Huang said:

“STEM subjects are alive and kicking at JAGS and we are all well aware of the significance of bringing so many young women into this area of study.  We are so proud of Emily and delighted by her well-earned success.  She is a fantastic role model to younger pupils at JAGS and beyond.”

Emily showed her project to thousands of visitors to The Big Bang Fair at the NEC in Birmingham, the largest celebration of science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) for young people in the UK.

The day after winning she also sat on the BBC Breakfast sofa alongside other winners from the day she talked to the presenters, and millions of viewers watching about her work. 

 

Open Days

Senior School (11-18yrs)

Saturday 7th October, 10am-1pm

Senior School (11+ only)

Wednesday 27th September, 1030am-12noon

Thursday 19th October, 10.30am-12noon

 

For additional Wednesday morning tours of the Pre-prep and Prep please contact Anne Long 020 8693 3465

 

SOME OF OUR SCHOOLS REQUIRE YOU TO BOOK A PLACE AT AN OPEN DAY. PLEASE CHECK SCHOOL WEBSITES FOR DETAILS.
 

Edward Alleyn’s Gift: The Foundation Schools’ Concert Southbank Centre’s Royal Festival Hall, 16 March 2016

The three Dulwich Foundation Schools Alleyn’s, Dulwich College and JAGS will come together on 16 March 2016 to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the consecration of Christ’s Chapel of God’s Gift at Dulwich. 

Over 450 pupils, alumni, teachers, parents and members of the local community will perform Verdi’s choral masterpiece, the Requiem Mass at Southbank Centre’s Royal Festival Hall. They will be joined by internationally recognised soloists Jane Irwin (Soprano), Louise Callinan (Mezzo Soprano), David Butt Philip (Tenor) and Rodney Earl Clarke, Old Alleynian (Bass). 

Verdi’s Requiem is a masterpiece of late 19th century composition and the programme will also include Verdi’s Pater Noster which will be performed by all those singing and playing. The concert will be conducted by the three Directors of Music: Mr Chris Dearmer, Mr Richard Mayo and Mr Peter Gritton.

Christ’s Chapel in Dulwich was consecrated in 1616 by George Abbot, Archbishop of Canterbury, as part of the Dulwich College foundation. Edward Alleyn built his College of God’s Gift on Dulwich Green and since then the Chapel has been a place of worship for the local community and for the three Dulwich Schools of the Foundation; Alleyn’s, Dulwich College and JAGS. 

The Heads of the three Foundation Schools, Dr Gary Savage of Alleyn’s, Dr Joe Spence of Dulwich College, and Sally-Anne Huang of JAGS, anticipate this wonderful occasion will be an opportunity for the wider communities of the three schools to come together and celebrate in music. All are welcome and tickets are available through Southbank Centre.

2015 TeenTech awards

An e-water tap for Africa, a flat-pack disaster home, sunglasses to monitor epilepsy and a guitar with never-ending strings were just some of the winning innovations showcased by talented teenagers at the 2015 TeenTech Awards. These awards were created for UK students from 11-16 to look at problems around them, both large and small, to see if they can find solutions. The industry judges were bowled over by the creativity and skills shown by young people across the UK.

Over 100 young innovators travelled to London to present their pioneering ideas to teams of judges made up of industry experts, celebrity science presenters, journalists and eminent academics including Top Gear’s James May, BBC Click’s Kate Russell, BBC Bang Goes The Theory’s Dallas Campbell, actress Katy Brand, comedian Jon Culshaw, TV’s Dr Christian Jessen and TeenTech co-founder and BBC Tomorrow’s World reporter Maggie Philbin.

Congratulations to James Allen’s Girls’ School pupils, Y10 Alice Hopkins and Iona Tompkins, pictured with sixth form Arkwright Scholar and mentor, Katherine Gray, who recently won TeenTech’s brand-new award for 2015. The ‘Consumer Innovation’ category challenged participants to use technology to solve an everyday problem. It’s all under wraps, but TeenTech sponsor, Maplin, is now working with Alice and Iona on their product for helping cyclists to indicate more clearly and safely, which will be marketed, and sold in their stores – with all profits going back to the winners. They will receive their award at Buckingham Palace in November.